Inadequacy and Jealousy From Social Media

Nov 13, 2014

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With 1.23 billion monthly active users on Facebook, 241 million monthly active users on Twitter and millions of others on many other social media websites, comparing ourselves to all the other users online is common. As a result, many social media users get feelings of inadequacy and jealousy.

As part of a study entitled “Digital Detoxing,” avid social network users were challenged to not use technology at all for 48 hours. The participants were then asked to share their experiences with it.

Participants were also asked some questions as part of a survey. 62% of contestants said that they felt inadequate when comparing their own achievements to other people’s posts on social media and 60% of people felt envious of things other people posted.

“Social media at its best is a great way to stay in touch with friends, have a chuckle and learn new things- as well as being the world’s leading source of amusing cat pictures,” said Debbie Bines, the study’s director. “But when things get out of balance and we start comparing ourselves to others, or feeling irritated, jealous or even ugly, it’s got to be time to take a break.”

Half of the participants stated that they have considered abandoning social media completely but didn’t want to abandon the connections that they have on social media. The survey also found that many of the participants get irritated about posts that reveal others' feelings and emotions.

If you or your child or someone you love seems to be getting these feelings of jealousy and inadequacy as a result of social media use, consider cutting back on social media use. Net Nanny Social is a good way to monitor the things that your child is posting on social media and to know who your child’s friends are on social media. Be sure to also talk to your child about appropriate use of social media, such as excessive social media use and cyberbullying.

Source: http://www.techtimes.com/articles/11232/20140726/social-media-make-people-feel-inadequate-jealous-survey.htm