The Official Net Nanny Blog

Connected Toys Are the Weak Security Link

“Internet of Things” and “smart homes” are the latest trends to see a major upswing in the world today.

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As a mother of I what I consider “pretty good" kids, I want to give them access to the latest technologies and allow them the freedom of surfing and playing games on the internet. 

Encouraging Responsible Behavior on the Internet

As a mother of I what I consider “pretty good" kids, I want to give them access to the latest technologies and allow them the freedom of surfing and playing...

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I was at a friend's house last week and I was shocked when he said "I really wish I could control what my kids do with their iPhones and iPods". It was almost this helpless, "Oh well" tone from him.

iPod/iPhone/iPad controls, not really that hard

I was at a friend's house last week and I was shocked when he said "I really wish I could control what my kids do with their iPhones and iPods".

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As parents, it's easy to rely on ratings. They are an extremely simple way to judge how 'good' or 'clean' a movie is. At least that's what we tell ourselves. Have you ever seen a PG-13 movie and thought "That's not clean enough for my 13-year-old. Or even me!"?

In the beginning, movies weren't rated at all. Then in the 1920's Hollywood began producing increasingly risque films. Concerned citizens recommended a code of standards which the head of the movie industry, Will Hays, liked and put into use. Starting in 1934 and lasting for nearly thirty years, nearly every movie made in the US had to abide by the Motion Picture Production Code. And it wasn't a graded rating system like the one used today- you either passed or failed and failure meant the movie wasn't released.

Over time though, the code was rewritten to be more and more lenient until by the late 1960s, it was just a few bullet points that let nearly anything through. And movies that failed to pass were starting to be released anyway. So on November 1, 1968, the MPAA came out with the graded rating system we know today.

The government has nothing to do with the ratings. A bunch of movie industry employees watch the movie and give their personal opinion about it and they take those opinions to make a rating. When you see NR or Unrated it means the film wasn't even submitted to this process. But the MPAA does not have a published guideline on what qualifies for which rating. When you see a rating- it doesn't mean much.

So the movie ratings are made by the movie industry. And TV ratings? Made by the TV channels. That's right. The company that displays the show decides what rating should go with it.

In both these cases, when you look at a rating, it's a somewhat arbitrary judgement call by a group of people in an industry whose first responsibility is to sell movies and TV shows. They do not care about your family- they are in business to make money and the only reason they use ratings is that they prefer doing it themselves to having the government (or you) get involved.

Luckily, the Internet doesn't have to be this way. The Net Nanny internet filter, for example, has default settings to keep your family safe online, but you can customize those settings to be what you think they should be. You don't have to go along with what everyone in the US, your state, or your neighborhood think. You can make the choice yourself. Your standards, your Internet. Online peace of mind because you're making the decisions instead of a panel of strangers.

What Goes Into a Movie or TV Rating?

As parents, it's easy to rely on ratings. They are an extremely simple way to judge how 'good' or 'clean' a movie is. At least that's what we tell ourselves.

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When I was a kid, I loved the back to school season.  I would scour the Sunday newspaper ads for cool new clothes, schools supplies, and maybe a new bike.  I liked packing my backpack full of new gear, especially a wonderful new pencil box - it just had that "new" year smell.  Do they make those anymore?  Back to school shopping has definitely changed.  These days it's about computers and Smartphones.  If your kids have already started their campaign for a new phone, leaving ads on your pillow at night, or on the breakfast table, you're not alone.   Here are a few tips for parents struggling with the idea of what to do when their sweet little angel wants to spend more time texting than riding a bike.

Safe Cell Phone Tips for Kids

When I was a kid, I loved the back to school season. I would scour the Sunday newspaper ads for cool new clothes, schools supplies, and maybe a new bike.

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Great news was announced today for California residents and Facebook users concerned about cyberbullying. California passed Assembly Bill 746 (http://bit.ly/pY0oCi) which makes cyberbullying a offense worthy of school suspension.

The battle against Cyberbullying takes a step forward

Great news was announced today for California residents and Facebook users concerned about cyberbullying. California passed Assembly Bill 746 (http://bit.ly/pY0oCi) which makes cyberbullying a offense worthy of school suspension.

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At ContentWatch we realize that Internet safety is not just one person's commitment or one company's solution. A variety of resources and efforts are needed to keep the internet safe and to break addictions. That is why we are so excited to join the Be Aware: Porn Harms campaign by Morality in Media.

It Takes A Village

At ContentWatch we realize that Internet safety is not just one person's commitment or one company's solution.

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When you heard the word "Predator" do you think of the creature from the movies? I know I tend to do so. Of course with this type of image in one's head it is easy to be scared or want to turn and run the other way. But what if the Predator we are talking about looked like the neighbor? Would you know how to tell who is a Predator in your neighborhood? What about online?

The Predator Next Door

When you heard the word "Predator" do you think of the creature from the movies? I know I tend to do so.

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Microsoft has made it very easy to setup multiple user accounts so that each family member can have their own login yet many shared computers remain configured with a single account. In my house we have about ten different users who routinely use our home computer.  There's my wife, our four kids, me, and about 4 of my kids' friends. In addition there's the occasional houseguest who wants to use the computer to check their email or do some online shopping or book a flight back home.  So, do we create a separate Windows account for each person? Would it be better to have fewer accounts (maybe something like “Parents, “Kids, “Guests)? Or does it make sense to just have a single Windows account that everybody shares?

How do you use your home computer when there are multiple different family members who all share a single computer?

Microsoft has made it very easy to setup multiple user accounts so that each family member can have their own login yet many shared computers remain configured with a single account.

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Any college basketball aficionado is sure to know the name of Jimmer Fredette, who played as a Senior guard for BYU last year. He won numerous national player of the year awards and was recently picked by the Sacramento Kings in the first round (#10 pick) of the draft. Partway through the 2010-11 season, Jimmer's popularity as an explosive player that could score from anywhere south of the middle court line earned him verb status. The rather raucous crowds of over twenty two thousand fans that would flock to see Jimmer play live chanted “You Got Jimmered as a taunt toward opposing teams as Jimmer dropped baskets.

Likewise, Net Nanny has been explodingly successful as an Internet filter, earning best Internet filter awards from PC Magazine, Top Ten Reviews, and numerous other media outlets. As the industry leader in Internet filtering, Net Nanny was first to introduce proxy filtering, social network monitoring, and profanity masking. Just like Jimmer, Net Nanny has been recognized in the software hall of fame with it's very own verb status. A Google search of “net nannied returns over 300,000 results. Here's just a few of the best Net-Nanny-as-a-verb examples we could find:

You Got Net Nannied!

Any college basketball aficionado is sure to know the name of Jimmer Fredette, who played as a Senior guard for BYU last year.

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Devices

Family Pass

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Net Nanny for Android® & Internet Filter for iOS® available exclusively
with the Family Protection Pass.

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Mac Windows Android IOS